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4 questions to ask when you get your PSAT scores back

It’s a weird year for the PSAT. If you took the test in October, your scores are due to come out the week of December 7th. College Board did announce an additional test date of January 26th which many schools are following. Those scores are due to be out in mid-March. If you are currently […]

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What you need to know about National Merit awards

National Merit. School counselors talk about it. School districts publicize it. However, many parents and students aren’t really sure what it is beyond some sort of academic honor that smart kids pursue. Check out this post for ideas about what to do once you get your PSAT scores back. It all hinges on the Junior […]

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“Test Optional” wasn’t intended to help students

One of the many impacts of COVID19 has meant a drastic change admissions policies related to the SAT and ACT. Colleges and universities have sold it to applicants as “test optional”, and students and parents have taken that to mean that they no longer need to take the SAT or ACT in order to be […]

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5 things high school Juniors should do right now

The June SAT has been cancelled, as were the March and May tests before it and the April ACT as well. At the time of writing this, ACT is adamant that they will be offering tests in June and July, even adding test dates to both months to accommodate the 1 million or so students […]

5 Steps for Getting Letters of Recommendation from Your Teachers

It’s the time of year when high school juniors are starting to look at the long slog between Spring Break and the end of the school year with something between sighing resignation and outright panic. AP and IB exams will take up May with Final Exams on their heels. They may be squeezing another SAT […]

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8 steps to preparing for the SAT or for the ACT

Students face two huge obstacles as they get ready for the SAT or ACT. The toughest is finding the time. They’re busy and their schedules are extremely full already. Blocking out an hour or two a day to focus on a test that won’t have an immediate impact on their grades is tough when that […]

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What you should know about Test Optional Policies

The typical press release from colleges who make the decision involves statements about how they recognize that students are more than a test score. That the college is committed to taking a look at the whole student.

Those platitudes are noble, and in cases like the UChicago or Wake Forest or Bates,  they seem sincere. I’m not entirely convinced that the motives behind some of the recent announcements from Northern Illinois and Lourdes are quite as high-minded.

The problem with student debt

It’s a tough conversation, but there are likely other, better options. At first it probably seems unfair. The student did all the right things. Isn’t the reward supposed to be going to the school of their dreams?

When they graduate with $75,000 of student debt, the dream becomes a nightmare.